Bagna Cauda Recipe

A Cassic Bagna Cauda Recipe with Garlic and Italian Anchovy

One of the exotic dishes that have great appeal from Italy is called Bagna Cauda. You might be shy to read the ingredients list for this dish, but once you taste it, you won't be able to stop. Here, KITCHENBAR shares with you a classic, rich and delicious Bagna Cauda recipe that will satisfy all your senses.

The Origin of Bagna Cauda

The origin of Bagna Cauda

1. What is Bagna Cauda?

The oddity of the Bagna Cauda attacks in two levels. At first, the idea was simply odd - an incomprehensible salty and spicy dipping dish filled with garlic and anchovies. It's hard to imagine who would at first think of piling those two strong ingredients together into a brown mud and oil, but that person should have a holiday named after them, because the results seem to be. as impossible and deviant as the original idea is undeniably delicious.

The second is the oddity of its origin. Bagna Càuda comes from Piedmont in northwest Italy, a land surrounded by the Alps and famous for its mountain cheeses, hazelnuts, and white truffles. You wouldn't expect anchovies to be one of the region's signature ingredients, as there are no oceans in sight, but they still do. They savored the tomato bagna, flavoring the Piedmontian version of the salsa verde, and intensifying the tuna's fishiness in its tonnato of the same name, all of which are local delicacies.

2. The History of Bagna Cauda

So how did these little salty fish become central to Piedmontian cooking? There are many theories, but the theory is more likely to be related to the salt itself. Salt was heavily taxed along its trade routes once a valuable commodity. To avoid those taxes, some merchants began packing their salt under layers of anchovies - if a government employee opened the barrel, they would see the anchovies and wave them over without claiming the salt tax.

This activity brought salted anchovies to Piedmont, where they became a staple in the kitchen. This eventually led to a whole new, legal anchovy industry out there. Each year after the summer's harvest is complete, poor farmers from Piedmont's Maira Valley will walk to the Ligurian coast to load cars loaded with anchovies. Then they returned, roaming every town and village in Piedmont all winter, selling their preserved fish barrels. This custom prevailed until World War II, when motor vehicles took most of the mobile acciughe - the anchovies traders - out of the business.

3. The Taste of Bagna Cauda

Bagna Cauda recipe significantly expands thanks to the ability to melt into anchovy sauce. Instead of just melting a little anchovy fillet into the sauce to subtly enhance the flavor, the tomato bagna has turned this dish into the highlight of the sauce. Most recipes want the anchovy to dissolve and then disappear, leaving a whisper of deliciousness. Bagna wanted those whispers to accumulate until they became a continuous and explosive chorus. The effect is no longer a kind of vague "salty", but the full intensity and brute force of the fishy, ​​salty anchovies.

However, the anchovies alone will be extremely salty, so they must be cut with something, and the Bagna Càuda also continues to break here. It blends one of the most assertive flavors of the sea with one of earth's most pungent flavors - garlic, and so much of it. They cook together in olive oil until it forms a thick mixture that its ingredients cannot distinguish, either by sight or taste.

Classic Bagna Cauda recipe
Classic Bagna Cauda recipe

Bagna Cauda Recipe

Yields1 Serving
Prep Time20 minsCook Time2 hrs 30 minsTotal Time2 hrs 50 mins

Ingredients

 Raw Vegetables of your choice
 1/4 cup olive oil, extra-virgin, or butter (or a combination of both)
 6 to 8 cloves garlic
 2 cups heavy cream
 1 (1 pound) loaf crusty Italian or French bread, cut into 2-inch sections
 1/8 teaspoon cayenne pepper
 1 tablespoon parsly, fresh, chopped (optional)
 10 flat anchovy fillets, finely-chopped, packed in olive oil, drained*

Directions

1

First, prepare the vegetables and bread for dipping. You can choose whatever you like, cut into slices ready to serve.

2

Heat a little oil in a saucepan and then add the anchovy fillet and minced garlic / crushed. Boil the anchovies and garlic until the anchovies are melted and mixed with garlic.

3

Leave it long enough for the garlic to ripen, but it will not darken or burn. Add the butter, then remove the pan from the stove.

4

Beat the butter, anchovies, and garlic together until all is well combined, then transfer the dipping item into a warm ramekin and serve.

5

It is as easy as that. This bagna cauda recipe is perfect for appetizers or appetizers with drinks. You can also keep it hot with a small burner underneath the heat-resistant plate and serve it at dinner parties.

Tips for a delicious Bagna Cauda recipe

Tips for a Delicious Bagna Cauda Recipe

In the Piedmontese dialect, bagna Càuda means "hot bath". A terracotta fujot, warmed with a candle underneath, is the traditional serving pot. But a sauce pot (or electric fryer) in the middle of the table is a perfect replacement.

Use this hot sauce with vegetables and crispy bread for dipping. Choose seasonal vegetables like cauliflower, carrots, dill, cabbage, celery, and sweet peppers (bell peppers). Cut into small pieces to taste them all to taste. If you like, lightly steam the vegetables.

Put the vegetables on the plate and the bread in the basket. Put the hot sauce in a fujot pot or sauce and gather with friends and family around the table to eat. Each eatery dips or does as we do, providing each individual bowl for your guests. Pour red wine into a glass and enjoy!

Frequently Asked Questions about Bagna Cauda Recipe

1. Can this be done first?

Bagna Càuda is easily pre-made and refrigerated until serving. Be sure to heat thoroughly.

2. Is it too much garlic and anchovies?

It sounds like a lot but the combination is great even for those who do not like anchovies.

3. Can I freeze leftovers?

You probably can, though I never have. The remainder of the cauda bagna is wonderfully mixed over pasta or on a pizza.

4. Which wine is suitable for Bagna Cauda?

In Alba, the classic wine is Dolcetto and the reason is clear: the intensity of the bagna cauda, ​​which is very tasty and absorbent, and the green flavor of the vegetable needs a fresh but not too tannic wine, otherwise the tannins will Conflicts with the salty taste of the dish. Dolcetto is a simple, lively, non-alcoholic wine that is very suitable for spicy and savory dishes. Other recommended wines are Barbera or Nebbiolo, Barbaresco and Barolo, but we can also try a pink Spumante from Oltrepò Pavese if we want a froth.

Final Words

Hopefully with this greasy Bagna Cauda recipe, KITCHENBAR will help you add a delightful treat to indulge your family in everyday meals. Please share with us your achievements if possible. We look forward to hearing from you.

Ingredients

 Raw Vegetables of your choice
 1/4 cup olive oil, extra-virgin, or butter (or a combination of both)
 6 to 8 cloves garlic
 2 cups heavy cream
 1 (1 pound) loaf crusty Italian or French bread, cut into 2-inch sections
 1/8 teaspoon cayenne pepper
 1 tablespoon parsly, fresh, chopped (optional)
 10 flat anchovy fillets, finely-chopped, packed in olive oil, drained*

Directions

1

First, prepare the vegetables and bread for dipping. You can choose whatever you like, cut into slices ready to serve.

2

Heat a little oil in a saucepan and then add the anchovy fillet and minced garlic / crushed. Boil the anchovies and garlic until the anchovies are melted and mixed with garlic.

3

Leave it long enough for the garlic to ripen, but it will not darken or burn. Add the butter, then remove the pan from the stove.

4

Beat the butter, anchovies, and garlic together until all is well combined, then transfer the dipping item into a warm ramekin and serve.

5

It is as easy as that. This bagna cauda recipe is perfect for appetizers or appetizers with drinks. You can also keep it hot with a small burner underneath the heat-resistant plate and serve it at dinner parties.

Tips for a delicious Bagna Cauda recipe

A Cassic Bagna Cauda Recipe with Garlic and Italian Anchovy

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